Some basic tips on workers’ compensation
On behalf of The Kaufman Law Firm posted in Employee Rights on Monday, May 16, 2016.

If you are injured on the job, you may be entitled to workers’ compensation. Workers’ compensation pays you regular amounts to help cover your living expenses and partially replace your working wage until you can return to work. It also requires that your employer pay for any medical expenses related to your injury. But these benefits are not automatic; you must file a claim and it must be approved before you can begin receiving payments. This post will go over some basics tips regarding your benefits.

You need to notify your supervisor as soon as possible. If you are severely injured and unable to do so initially, you have up to 30 days to notify your employer. Failure to report within 30 days could result in a denial of your benefits. You may have a co-worker or family member notify your employer but they must be able to answer some questions about you and the injury. If instead of a sudden injury, you are slowly getting sick, then you should report it to your supervisor the moment you determine that you are sick.

If it is an emergency, seek medical attention and, if possible, tell the treating staff that you were injured while at work. Once your claim is filed, your employer must pay for your medical expenses, regardless of whether you miss work or not.

Here are some general tips on workers’ compensation:

  • Temporary and part-time workers are eligible to receive benefits.
  • Workers’ compensation benefits are not dependent on lawful resident status.
  • Your employer cannot fire or punish you for reporting an injury and filing a claim.

If you were injured at work, you may have a valid workers’ compensation claim. Most companies should have a streamlined process to help you easily file your claim. However, you may still want to have a lawyer go over the paperwork with you. Your Human Resources Rep may sound like he or she is on your side but remember that you are filing a claim to collect payments from your employer. This claim is going to cost them money so their interests are opposed to yours. A lawyer can work to help ensure that you are being treated fairly and your claim is properly filed.

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