California Disability Discrimination: The ADA and FEHA

California FEHA & ADA Laws

The Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA") and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act ("FEHA") protect qualified people with disabilities but who can do the job. It requires employers to make reasonable accommodations to allow disabled people to perform a job's essential functions. For employees with a disability or serious medical condition who can perform the essential functions of the job, these laws provide protection from discrimination.

At The Kaufman Law Firm, we represent employees who have been victims of disability discrimination. If you believe your employer has broken a labor law against you, talk with us. Located in Westlake Village, California, we represent employees throughout Los Angeles and Southern California. We're dedicated to representing employees in disputes against their employers regarding the FEHA & ADA laws in California FEHA & ADA laws. We have successfully won numerous trials, arbitrations, and appeals and have litigated on behalf of thousands of people just like you.

We are dedicated to enforcing the protections for disabled employees of all kinds throughout California.


We'll Put Our Vast Experience to Work for You
For 20+ years, Los Angeles discrimination attorney Matthew A. Kaufman has recovered millions of dollars on behalf of clients in more than one hundred verdicts and settlements.

If you need experienced and trusted representation by a California ADA attorney, who'll fight passionately for your rights, contact Mr. Kaufman at 866-278-2385 or Email us here to discuss your case.



More information on Disability Discrimination

Duties Employers Owe Applicants & Employees with Disabilities

Under federal "ADA" law, employers must make reasonable accommodations to enable an employee with a disability to perform a position's essential functions. A reasonable accommodation is an action that enables an employee with a disability to receive the same opportunities and benefits of employment as other employees. Employers must provide:

  • Workplace facilities access for disabled individuals
  • Transfer or reassignment to a vacant position for which the disabled employee is qualified
    Part-time or modified work schedules
    Modified equipment or devices to accommodate a disabled employee

    However, the employer's duty to accommodate has its limits. Accommodations must not impose an "undue hardship" on the operation of the employer's business. The employee must prove that the accommodation is reasonable both in cost and benefit to the employer's business.


Proving a Claim
Generally, three things must be proven for an individual to prevail under a claim:

  • A plaintiff must prove that one has a disability, and
  • A plaintiff must be a "qualified individual," capable of performing the essential functions of a job either with or without reasonable accommodation, and
  • A plaintiff must have been unlawfully discriminated against because of his or her disability.